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Recent Headlines

Wednesday 05/27/2020
During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Don’t Ignore Signs of Stroke
Posted: May 27, 2020

(StatePoint) With hospitals around the country reporting a recent drop in the number of stroke cases arriving in their emergency rooms, some health experts suspect that fear of COVID-19 may be causing people to avoid going to the hospital and calling 911 for non-COVID related medical emergencies, like stroke.

5 Ways to Master a Move
Posted: May 27, 2020

(StatePoint) While real estate agents report that far fewer people than normal have been moving during the COVID-19 pandemic, that may soon change. A recent Harris Poll found that nearly a third of U.S. adults living in urban areas are considering a move to less densely populated cities in the wake of the pandemic. Others may not be fleeing the pandemic but simply want or need to move, either for a job change or other reason.

Tuesday 05/26/2020
Conectividad transformadora
Posted: May 26, 2020

(NAPSMI)—La tecnología es esencial para cualquier empresa pequeña, ya sea un paisajista, un establecimiento minorista, una firma consultora o cualquier otra empresa. A continuación hay cinco tecnologías que fortalecen y apoyan a su negocio.

As World Faces Health Crises, New Report Finds Trust Is Vital
Posted: May 26, 2020

(NAPSI)—Recently, health experts gathered online to forecast the future of medicine. One theme: the increasing frequency of global crises.  

Now, COVID-19 has brought this hypothetical threat to life, and a report by the U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP), an independent, nonprofit, scientific organization dedicated to improving public health through public standards and related programs that help ensure the quality, safety and benefit of medicines and foods, and the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence can help. Called “Trust or Consequences 2040: Will Innovations in Health and Medicine Deliver?” identifies what may happen in the future and explores the role that trust will play in helping people live longer and healthier. It identifies likely drivers of change, such as big data, artificial intelligence (AI), gene editing, risks to health systems and medicine supply chains and opportunities to improve global health. Four scenarios surfaced:

Scaling the tried and true: Rolling crises spur effective global collaboration to address health concerns. Medical advances based on big data and AI are implemented gradually. The focus is on baseline healthcare for all. 

Dangerous uncertainty: Problems with big data and AI lead to devastating healthcare failures. Unequal access to innovation means only the rich receive advanced treatments; people turn to folk medicines, science-based medicine is questioned. 

A world of difference: The success of big data and AI in healthcare leads to rapid advances in personalized medicine and prevention. Not everyone can access this and disparities between and within countries perpetuate a “haves” versus “have nots” dynamic. 

Solving tomorrow’s problems: Smart innovation is widely distributed. Big data and AI create inexpensive diagnostic tools. Diseases become more predictable and healthcare emphasizes prevention. New treatments and technological advances curb costs. 

The report also suggests how public quality standards for medical products could help promote trust in health and medicine in the future—as they have for 200 years. 

“Many of the challenging issues we face in healthcare are recurring and persistent. ‘Trust or Consequences 2040’ points out that we must plan for the future we want, or we risk failure and an erosion of trust. Standards offer a proven approach to building trust and ensuring as many people as possible benefit from promising innovations in health and medicine,” said Ronald T. Piervincenzi, Ph.D., CEO of USP.

Read the report at www.usp.org/trustorconsequences. Share your opinion on social media using #TrustTomorrow. 

 

What’s Your Advance Care Plan?
Posted: May 26, 2020

(NAPSI)—No matter your stage of life, it’s always a good idea to have a long-range care plan in place. A good way to begin is to talk candidly with your family and friends. By starting the conversation, you can express your views on treatment, relay your care preferences and communicate who will make decisions on your behalf. This process of advance-care planning can help ensure your wishes are carried out and bring peace of mind to those you love. 

Build your advance care plan 

•Durable financial power of attorney: This document authorizes a person to make legal or financial decisions on your behalf if you are incapacitated. 

•Durable healthcare power of attorney: This document authorizes a person to make healthcare decisions on your behalf if you are unable to do so. 

•Advance-care directive: This document specifies how you receive care in the event you are unable to make those decisions on your own. 

•Long-term care insurance: This is an insurance product that pays for long-term care services in a variety of settings. 

Documents and requirements may differ by state. Please consult a legal or financial advisor to ensure use of the correct forms. 

Make the Federal Long Term Care Insurance Program (FLTCIP) part of your plan  

As you make plans for the future, consider the potential need for long-term care and the effect it could have on you and your family. 

Long-term care is the ongoing aid you need if you can no longer perform everyday tasks by yourself due to chronic illness, injury, disability, or the aging process. This type of care is expensive but there’s a way to get help paying for it.  

Applying for long-term care insurance coverage under the FLTCIP may be a smart choice for you. The FLTCIP is designed to reimburse for qualified long-term care services and can help lessen or eliminate your reliance on a loved one to provide hands-on care.  

The FLTCIP offers you a choice of caregivers. Informal care provided by friends and family members is covered, as long as the caregiver isn’t your spouse or domestic partner and doesn’t live in your home at the time you become eligible for benefits. (Benefits for care provided by family members is limited to 500 days.) 

Care provided in an assisted-living facility, an adult daycare, or a nursing home is also covered. If home care is your preference, the stay-at-home benefit includes a range of services that support care in your home, helping you maintain your quality of life in familiar surroundings. 

Taking the next step 

The FLTCIP is sponsored by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, insured by John Hancock Life & Health Insurance Company, and administered by Long Term Care Partners, LLC. To learn more about the comprehensive benefits and features, call 1-800-LTC-FEDS (1-800-582-3337) TTY 1-800-843-3557 or visit LTCFEDS.com.

 

New campaign offers resources for thyroid cancer patients
Posted: May 26, 2020

(BPT) - Every year in the United States, more than half a million people with a thyroid nodule undergo testing to determine whether they have thyroid cancer. Recent research has shown that many of these patients aren’t fully informed about the possible outcomes of this testing and don’t know what questions to ask their doctors. This can increase patients’ anxiety and decrease their chances of receiving the best care for their thyroid nodule or thyroid cancer. A new educational campaign is now available to help patients better understand thyroid cancer diagnosis and their testing options.

COVID-19 Can Cause Kidney Injury, Yet Most Americans Don’t Know It
Posted: May 26, 2020

(NAPSI)—According to a recent Harris Poll, too many people don’t know all they should about the dangers of coronavirus—particularly how it can affect the kidneys. 

COVID-19, it seems, attacks more than just the lungs.  

In the new National Kidney Foundation-Harris Poll Survey on COVID-19 and Kidney Health, the findings show low levels of awareness on both the risk of developing an acute kidney injury as a result of COVID-19 and of the long-term effects of kidney damage. 

“A significant number of patients going into the hospital to be treated for COVID-19 are coming out as kidney patients,” said Kevin Longino, CEO, National Kidney Foundation and a kidney transplant patient himself. “We believe this may be a looming healthcare crisis that will put a greater strain on hospitals, dialysis clinics and patients, for whom chronic kidney disease will be a lasting remnant of the coronavirus crisis—even after a vaccine is, hopefully, found.”  

Acute kidney injury 

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a sudden episode of kidney failure or kidney damage that happens within a few hours or a few days, and is happening in about 15 percent of all hospitalized coronavirus patients, many of whom now need dialysis.

If a patient ends up in the intensive care unit (ICU) their odds worsen; reports indicate that one in five intensive-care patients have lost kidney function. COVID-19 will likely result in a higher number of Americans with chronic kidney disease and/or kidney failure than before the pandemic. Once kidneys fail, dialysis or a transplant is needed to survive.  

Hospital shortages 

Hospitals aren’t prepared for the expected increase of kidney patients. In hot spots of the outbreak there are shortages of dialysis equipment, supplies and nurses properly trained to administer dialysis in the ICU. Most Americans, according to the Harris Poll, are concerned and want the federal government to step in. 

Further, the Harris Poll found that the vast majority of Americans want the federal government to provide more resources toward diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of kidney disease, and significantly increased funding for kidney research because of kidney-related illness from COVID-19.  

More poll results 

The poll also found: 

•Only 17 percent Americans are aware of acute kidney injury as a result of COVID-19;  

•Only 46 percent of Americans are aware that COVID-19 will likely increase the number of Americans with chronic kidney disease or kidney failure; 

•58 percent of Americans are aware that COVID-19 can cause acute respiratory failure; 

•54 percent know it can cause pneumonia; 

•52 percent of those surveyed know COVID-19 can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome. 

Learn More

Additional information about COVID-19 and how it affects kidneys can be found at www.kidney.org/coronavirus.  

 

It's time to get more kids biking
Posted: May 26, 2020

(BPT) - For kids, biking is one of the gateways to growing up. Popular films and TV hits such as “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” and “Stranger Things” highlight the joy a bike can bring as a fun way to explore or spend time kicking around the neighborhood. Yet, according to a study from the Outdoor Industry Association, bike riding among kids declined 19% between 2007 and 2019.